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School Transition

Daniel’s Music Foundation - 2017 Annual Spring Benefit - We Sing Together

Daniel’s Music Foundation - 2017 Annual Spring Benefit - We Sing Together

Ken and Daniel Trush of Daniel's Music Foundation

Ken and Daniel Trush of Daniel's Music Foundation

Last night, Katie and Mike Sweeney were able to attend the fundraiser for a once again great organization that brings music to Dustin Sweeney and his friends - Daniel's Music Foundation

Daniel’s Music Foundation empowers individuals with developmental and physical disabilities by combining recreational music programs with community and socialization. We use the transformative power of music to create a community that is built on acceptance and respect.
— Daniel's Music Foundation

Daniel’s Music Foundation was started after Daniel Trush had a series of undetected brain aneurysms at the age of 12, In 2005, after 8 years of searching, Daniel found that music was his “super power”. The Trush Family researched the power of music and programs that were available for individuals with disabilities, and they found there was a void. There were conservatories that focused on music performance and excellence and music therapy but there didn’t seem to be anything in between. And there were no programs available for individuals with disabilities in a group setting. Daniel's Music filled that niche.

In the post-21+ life for Dustin Sweeney and his friends, Daniel's Music will continue to be a big part of his life. 

 

Madison House #IMAGINE21 - Documentary Series on Post-21 Autism Adults

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Madison House #IMAGINE21 - Documentary Series on Post-21 Autism Adults


Madison House Autism Foundation is excited to introduce the premiere of the #Imagine21 mini-documentary series!

At age 21, our friends with autism lose access to many of the supports they receive as children. #Imagine21 films highlight the incredible stories of adults living with autism. Through them, viewers will be intimately acquainted with just a few of the people behind this diagnosis and come to a fuller understanding of the value they have to add to our lives when communities respond to the challenges they face.

Watch Jeffrey's story below that focuses on the topic of post-secondary education and the importance of lifelong learning for adults on the autism spectrum.

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AHRC NYC: Guide to Independent Living for People with Disabilities

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AHRC NYC: Guide to Independent Living for People with Disabilities

Reposted from AHRC NYC:

Self-advocates from AHRC New York City, the Brooklyn-based design studio Second Marriage, and the Center for Urban Pedagogy, (CUP) have collaborated to create a comprehensive, easy-to-understand guide to independent living for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities, through CUP’s Making Policy Public program.  The Center for Urban Pedagogy is a nonprofit organization that uses the power of design and art to increase meaningful civic engagement. CUP collaborates with designers, educators, advocates, students, and communities to make educational tools that demystify complex policy and planning issues.

The self-advocates who helped to shape the guide by providing their insights and feedback included Timothy HicksJanice BartleyDaphne DesinorEmily Schwarz, and Chad DeRoche.

AHRC NYC’s Individualized Supports staff, Carole GothelfDirectorJennifer TeichProject Coordinator; and Nicholas LegowskiSelf-Advocacy Advisor, all took active roles in the project.

The guide is a foldout poster complete with interactive charts, FAQs, and information about organizations that can help people with disabilities achieve their independent living goals.

Access the Free Guide Online

The guide can be viewed online, and AHRC NYC’s Individualized Supports department is working to provide printed version of the guide to a variety of organizations across the state.

Request Copies of the Printed Guide

If you would like to request a stock of these guides via mail, please contact one of the following people:

Carole Gothelf, Carole.Gothelf@ahrcnyc.org   212-780-2795
Jennifer Teich, Jennifer.Teich@ahrcnyc.org   914-224-2199
Nicholas Legowski, Nicholas.Legowski@ahrcnyc.org    917-484-2245

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Curbed NYC - A tool to find "Affordable Housing" in NYC

Curbed NYC - A tool to find "Affordable Housing" in NYC

Very nice tool for finding Affordable Housing in NYC:

and here are 11 examples of current models at Curbed NY:

"Affordable apartments certainly aren't easy to come by in New York City, but there's at least one source for those looking for less expensive housing: NYC Housing Connect, the city's one-stop-shop for all of the different affordable units (some in all-affordable buildings, others in luxury ones) coming onto the market. The site is updated regularly with new listings, and here, we've compiled all of the lotteries that are currently open to New Yorkers.

As with all things, though, there are caveats: applicants must make a certain percentage of the area median income (AMI); and, unsurprisingly, as more people search for affordable units, the number of applicants in these lotteries grows. But hey, it's still worth a shot. We'll update this map continuously, so be sure to tip us if you see a development that hasn't made it onto the list yet."

Long Island Fair Housing Seminar - Wednesday March 8th

Long Island Fair Housing Seminar - Wednesday March 8th

THIS IS ALL THE INFORMATION THAT I HAVE:


KNOW YOUR RIGHTS! Fair Housing Seminar

Please join us for a discussion on Fair Housing issues of concern to people with disabilities:

Free & Open to the Public

Wednesday, March 8, 2017

9:30 AM to 12:30 PM

Touro Law Center

225 Eastview Drive

Central Islip, NY 11722

RSVP to RSVP@dhr.ny.gov 

If you need an accommodation for disability, please contact John Herrion at 718-741-8332 or John.Herrion@dhr.ny.gov.

Light refreshments will be served

This event is presented in collaboration with, and funded by, the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development. 

Update from New Jersey: Rutgers Center for Adult Autism Services (RCAAS)

Update from New Jersey: Rutgers Center for Adult Autism Services (RCAAS)

I think this Rutgers Center has significant potential to be a beacon of light for our community. Here is the ORIGINAL POST and the update below from Christopher Manente:


You are receiving this message in response to a previous inquiry that you have made about the Rutgers Center for Adult Autism Services (RCAAS). I am writing with an update on the progress and current status of the RCAAS program. The RCAAS is officially approved as a provider of the NJ DDD supports program!  The application for admissions to the RCAAS day program and detailed information about admission criteria and the application process will be accessible via our website at: http://rcaas.rutgers.edu at approximately 9am on Tuesday 2/21/2017.  Specifically, there will be a tab on the RCAAS homepage with the heading “admissions” that you will be able to click in order to access the application.  It is anticipated that the RCAAS will be accepting 2-3 participants to start the program in April 2017 and another 2-3 participants to start in June 2017 (4-6 total for 2017) via this round of applications.  

Please continue to check the RCAAS website (rcaas.rutgers.edu) and our Facebook page (https://www.facebook.com/ChristopherManente) where I will be posting any day to day updates regarding the center. I hope that you find this information helpful.  As always, please let me know if you have any further questions. 

Christopher J. Manente

Christopher J. Manente

Christopher J. Manente, Ph.D., BCBA
Executive Director, Rutgers Center for Adult Autism Services
Graduate School of Applied and Professional Psychology
Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey
152 Frelinghuysen Road
Piscataway, NJ 08854

Phone: 848-445-3973 

Batman: Who will be Dusty's "Dark Knight" when I am gone?

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Batman: Who will be Dusty's "Dark Knight" when I am gone?

Batman is The Dark Knight that protects Gotham and its citizens from vice and villainy. Batman became an urban legend, a cautionary tale that sent shivers through the city’s underworld. Unlike most superheroes, Batman does not possess ANY superpowers. Rather, he relies on his genius intellect, physical prowess, martial arts abilities, detective skills, science and technology, vast wealth, intimidation, and indomitable will.
— Batman @ Wikipedia

Batman has always been my favorite Superhero and I came across this image/poster and purchased the image from Knoll Gilbert as it resonated the biggest question that I hear from Developmentally Disabled parents:

Who will take care of my child when I am gone? 

Batman overseeing Dustin Sweeney and his friends...

Batman overseeing Dustin Sweeney and his friends...

I had a tiny cancer scare after a recent colonoscopy, so this question really resonated with me for 3-4 days. Everything is fine now. 

Unfortunately, I don't have the answer today, and I want people to understand that being a "Community Developer" is much more important to me than the bricks and mortar of being a "Housing Developer".

Houses are simple. Communities are complicated. 

I think about these questions everyday, and we always seek support, ideas, and questions from the Developmentally Disabled community. 

Mahalo

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